Canterbury Knight: Inking fusible appliques

Some of the border items on my Canterbury Knight quilt need to be created off quilt and appliqued on, as opposed to painting directly onto the border.   Sew I had an idea to just take the item, cut it out of the full sized print version (digitally, using Corel Draw), and reverse it, and print it onto some fusible web with the protective paper still on it.  Originally, I was going to just iron it onto some appropriately colored pieces of cotton/silk Radiance and applique them on.  But when I got the printout (in color), I decided to put the web onto prepared-for-dye radiance and see if I could ink in the designs.  This is how it worked:

1.  Here is my design printed onto the 8 1/2 x 11 inch fusible web piece.  It is sitting on my light box.

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2.  Sew then I ironed it onto the radiance, turned it over, and taped it all to the light box.  I also found a small piece of the black silk, that I would be appliqueing it to, in order to place it under the white PFD radiance and test how the inks looked before I inked it.

Working on the boy musician who is announcing the arrival of the knight to the castle.

Working on the boy musician who is announcing the arrival of the knight to the castle.

 

Here is another one ready to ink.

I think of this character as "the angry bird" in the border.  He's fun.

I think of this character as “the angry bird” in the border. He’s fun.

And then I begin the inking.  Note that I went over the line in a few places and some of  the edges are a little smudgy, because the inks run a little more on the Radiance than they do on cotton.  It’s ok, the edges will be cut smoothly or outlined with quilting.  Pressing with a hot dry iron will stop the run.

Inking

Inking

Here are the small birds I placed around the text box.  These were the first ones I did this way.

My painted birds ready to applique

My painted birds ready to applique, their feet will be added after appliqueing.

And here you see the completely inked boy.  I cut him carefully out.  The bright colors get slightly muted when appliqued onto the black fabric.

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I used Pitt’s Artist Markers.  These markers are India inks, acid free, and appear to be permanent on cotton after heat setting.  i am not planning to wash this quilt at all, so I have not tested the colorfastness through the washing process for the silk/cotton.  I had noticed a note on Dick Blick’s where I order my markers from that they are not recommended for fabrics.  This concerned me, since I have been using them for years on my fabric arts.  So I wrote to Faber Castell and asked them why.  This was their response the very next day:

“Dear Ms. Tatum:

Thank you for your interest in Faber-Castell and the Art & Graphic Brand.

PITT Artist pens are not intended to be used on fabrics that are laundered because it will not remain on all fabrics when washed.  Therefore, testing is always recommended, depending on different variables some things work, some don’t.   Could you tell me how you are heat setting them, as this helps them endure a washing?

Please let me know if I can assist any further as I will surely do my best to help.”

 

I will say that I usually use prepared for dye fabrics for inking, but not always.  I always heat set the inking with steam.  If it is silk, I turn it over onto a piece of fine cotton and heat set from the back.  I have washed several of my cotton quilts with Pitt Artist Markers several times, and some of them have been around nine years now with no fading or running.  If you plan to use this product, do your own tests please.

Sew happy everyone!  Teach someone to quilt or sew…your grand kids, your grown kids, your young kids, your cat, your dog…Cheers!