Thinking of Wool for Quilted Art

Fabric is amazing.  As many of my gentle readers know who have been following my blog for these past few years, I love experimenting with fabrics of all types.  Right now, I am working on a rather large multi-faceted wool project having to do with applique and embellishment of wool that will hopefully result in a book (or two), a handful of small sized projects, a series of videos, and a show quilt.

I have always loved working with wool because it has incredible properties, but I have not until recently experimented with wool as a medium for fabric art.  Wool can be everything from sheer to amazingly heavy.  It can be woven in such a way as to capture the light in its folds or absorb the light so deeply it’s like night.  Black b0iled wool in the background, for instance, sets off bright colors in applique in an amazing way.

Just a test

Wool can be kind of expensive to work with, but the pieces I am developing for BJ’s Great Wool Project are small in size making it possible to use precuts or grab pieces from worn clothing for some of them and just purchase a yard or so for the background.

I am having one of those times when I start with a new idea and it suddenly explodes in my mind of what actually can be done to create fabric art that take it well beyond my original concept.  Oh my!  I’m having to keep a running set of side notes as I write my book so as not to lose these interesting ideas.  I think there is much to be done with this amazing fabric.

Just so you know, I am starting with folk art style projects in my wool applique by machine book that look quite traditional.  THis is a great way to learn the techniques needed for working with wool.  The more I have tried to come up with a nice set of projects for the book that are fun to do while teaching the techniques I want to teach, the more ideas fill my head.  The more I work with the fabric, and write about it, the more I think I have not really explored what can be done with this amazing fabric when used for an art medium.  These ideas are expanding from the folk art traditional look to quite a few “what ifs” that will be fun to explore after I finish the current book.

Some questions still  need to be answered for the book itself. How should I quilt the resulting pieces, or do they even need to be quilted? What will work best for quilting this fabric where thread tends to visibly sink into the fabric and disappear or take a back seat?  What if I use a more textured wool than traditional solid felted wool?  What if I join the heavier felted style wool with a selection of fabric textures and weaves in a single color in a single project?  How would I counter the different behaviors of the fabrics if I do that so the wall quilt, for instance, is flat and square?  Does it even need to be flat and square? How large should these projects be?  What kinds of embellishments need to be added in the way of threads, ribbons, yarns, cords, lace, embroidery, beads, buttons, and so forth? Can these all be added by machine? How should the quilting play within the designs? How can I make a fabulous artistic scene using the textures and the colors and the embellishments? Oh my!  So much to think about here. So exciting. So interesting.  So much to do….I must get busy,  LOL

I am trying to capture these what-ifs on paper  before my mind loses the train of thought so I can go back when I have the time and play with some of those what ifs.  Besides all of this, I still have a list of other quilts.  I think I need a clone or to live a couple of hundred years…hahahaha.

Sew happy everyone!  Capture those ideas as they run by and try them sometime.  Fabric is amazing,