My Uncle and What’s Happening in My Studio

I’ve taken too long to write a new post.  This past month has had its lows and highs.

My uncle Betterton passed a week and a half ago.  He was 91 and was two years younger than my mom.  I had five aunts and six uncles on my mom’s side and one aunt on my Dad’s side and all are gone now, as well as my parents.   Uncle Betterton was one of my favorite uncles.  He was always close with my mom and someone everyone could rely on for help.  He had various tough illnesses the last several years, mild dementia, and is now no longer suffering.  He was a strong Christian.  Like my father, he was a civil engineer, both served in WWII, and he and Dad enjoyed a strong friendship.  My memories of him are sweet and dear and the pain of losing him is softened by his wonderful long giving life and his final release from the difficulties of his last few years.

Sew what’s going on in my studio these days?  My “apprentice” Anita and I finished the church banner celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.  The church members apparently love it, and I was really pleased with how it looks.  I have still not gotten a good photo of it, but I will share as soon as I do.  The big community celebration is next Sunday.  I guess this tells you that I attend a Lutheran church.  I do.  It’s five minutes drive from my house and the it’s a lovely church with services not far in liturgical style from the Episcopal church.  I grew up an Episcopalian.  For many years I drove down to Georgetown to go to the historic St John’s Episcopal in Georgetown where Marvin and I both were very active and sang in the choir.  After Marvin passed, I moved to Ashburn, Virginia, and the drive to Georgetown got even longer, so I looked for somewhere closer.  Our Savior’s Way Lutheran Church is in my neighborhood…now that’s a luxury I had not had for decades.

I have gotten a start on my next show quilt.  I’m not sure I would call them “show quilts” any longer, except that’s a term many understand.  I like to show them, but my primary goal for these quilts is to make wonderful art, and hopefully sell most of them in the long run.  Everything I make I hope to meet show quilt level, but sometimes show judges don’t seem to understand why the techniques I choose are done the way they are, or how difficult they really are.  Sometimes they seem to see things and remark on them that I simply cannot see, and sometimes I think they don’t see something about my quilts that I think is especially unique and interesting.  Maybe I need new glasses, a flashlight, and a better magnifying glass.  Or maybe I need a microscope.  LOL  So I have found a lot of freedom in reaching for creating beautiful art the best way I can make it and not worrying too much about what a judge might see or not see.  Competition can be rough on one’s ego.  He-he-he

Anyway, back to my latest project.  It’s based on the art piece I bought the rights for one art quilt from the Disney artist Joel Christopher Payne.  It’s set in the Bayou and has interesting trees, and two rather rundown homes with light peaking out through the cracks in the boards.  One is a houseboat, and the other is a shack built on stilts on a platform.  The scene is at night and there is a little pale light filtering through the trees in a way that suggests a heart shape, and there are fireflies.  This is a huge challenge for me, but really, I am enjoying myself so far.

I have the houseboat “built” and the shack about half done.  Yesterday I did a little low and high lighting with Neocolor II pigment crayons.  When you use them with fabric, you can just color it on and then brush it with water to blend it onto the fabric and then heat set it for a permanent color.  Sometimes when I heat set it, it gets lighter so I have to go back and add more color, but it’s a wonderful way to over color an existing fabric pattern to add shadows and lights where you need them or “correct” colors.  In this case, I have three different wood print fabrics that I have backed with Steam-a-Seam II light and cut into board shapes.  I am using these to “build” the shack and the houseboat.

The picture has really big trees that also have some Spanish moss hanging from them.  I have five different tree bark prints that I will use to make the tree appliqués.  They, too will need to be overpainted to get the right look and color,  I am planning on thread painting the Spanish moss on, and probably it will be more than Joel put in his picture because this is a fabric and threads interpretation of his wonderful art piece.

I have obtained some glow in the dark paints and threads to make the fireflies with, and the paint has some additional pigment so it will look good in light too.  I may add crystals to the fireflies for added dimension.

The biggest challenge as I see it is the light that is getting the back light that is coming through the trees and reflecting across the water right.  I am thinking this will have to be done with paint, but I’m still thinking about it.

Sew I hope you all have a wonderful week.  Try something new and push to get it as well done as possible.  I have a lot going on in my studio besides this new quilt, so I hope I will get back to my weekly blogs for a while.  Cheers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Space and Quilts

The Heavens declare the glory of God…(Psalm 19:1) 

Wow!  This week with the eclipse and spending that time with my 14 year-old grandson Kevin was soooo special!  We had eighty-five percent of the eclipse in a pure clear sky with the birds and the noisy cicadas in the woods behind us.  His parents, who are serious astronomy hobbyists, headed down to Tennessee to get in a total eclipse area, but he did not want to spend that long in the car.  The traffic for them was aweful and they had to spend an extra night in a motel on the way home, so he clearly made the right choice for him and it gave me and his uncle David a real special time together with Kevin even though it was not total here.  I am told Ken got some photos to process of the eclipse.  I am looking forward to seeing them.

This comes at an interesting time in my quilting life, because I am trying to line up a couple of new deep space quilts to fill out my space series inspired by the fabulous photos found in the NASA gallery.  The pictures have to be copyright free for me.  I have tried a couple of times to get in touch with the astronomers whose pictures NASA sometimes shows that are copyrighted and they simply ignore my inquiries.  But there are many many magnificent copyright free photos available to use for the basis of new quilts.  I will probably also include a couple of space quilts that may use other techniques inspired by Ken’s (oldest son, Kevin’s Dad) and Beth’s (his wife) photography and ideas.  I am planning on writing about making space quilts and including all of these in the book.  This will probably be a part of my ongoing project of Art Quilt Basics:  Surface Design and Embellishment that I hope to get published this year.  These quilts are practically all surface design and embellishment with organic, but well planned, quilting.  They are very hard to photograph because of all the light reflection, but I leave that to Ken, who does a credible job on it.

Spiral Galaxy No. 3: See this quilt in the upcoming MQX Midwest show!

So I am currently on the hunt for my next deep space quilt photo inspirations.  If you have a favorite, let me know in a comment  but do it soon, because I’m going to start working on this next space quilt very soon. 😄

I hope you are all having fun with your art, sewing, or quilting.  I’m busy drawing up a couple of new ideas and making sampler quiltlets to include in my book project Art Quilt Basics:  Machine Quilting for Art Quilters (this book starts with the very basics for machine quilting (both feed dogs up and free motion) and moves through the process ending with a discussion and ideas specific for art quilters.

Sew happy everyone!  Make yourselves a stack of small quilt sandwiches and play.  You’ll be surprised how much fun it is…use all your machines.  You will benefit by improving your skills and having a lot of fun too.  Cheers.

 

Marathon of Quilting

Whew!  You haven’t heard from me here for a while because I was finishing making the quilt my son Ken designed for me to add to my Ancient Manuscript series in a marathon of quilt making and got my entry into the Mid Atlantic Quilt Festival (MAQF) just under the wire of the deadline.  This quilt is a tribute to King Arthur and the knights of the round table and is now named “Pendragon“.  I have been working nearly full time on this quilt since last March, with just a few breaks here and there. Without question it was the most difficult quilt I’ve ever made, but I was so happy to make it and am quite happy with its outcome.  I made this quilt for the love of my son, but I am going to enter it as extensively as possible in quilt shows so my friends and other quilt lovers can see it.  I will be posting photos of this quilt sometime in February along with a short series of blog posts on making the quilt.

I had planned on entering Drawing Nigh into MAQF, but it unexpectedly got into AQS Lancaster, and so will not be available for MAQF.

Today, I’m sewing the rod pocket and label onto Pendragon, and trying to rest my creaking quilting muscles.  No one will ever convince me that intense quilting like this is not something of a sport…it requires practice, muscles, sweat, blood, tears, and determination, and a marathon of such quilting leaves me tired and a bit achy…but I’ll recover.

Sew next I will be working on several less taxing quilts to go into my exhibit at G Street Fabrics in Rockville in the spring.  It should be really fun and I can provide photos of those along the way.

Sew happy everyone!  Will I see you at the Mid Atlantic Quilt Festival?

 

 

 

 

Happy 2017: A New Year Full of Promise and Opportunities!!!!

Happy New Year everyone!

I don’t know about you, but I’m very excited about the promise and opportunities this new year brings.  Right away in 2017 I have a batch of really exciting new projects all ready to start and several very interesting projects close to the finish.   My sons, daughter in law, and grandson all have made me proud and their future for this year looks really promising.  I even have begun to make some progress already on my plan to lose a lot of weight, which always seems harder for me than most.  I am grateful and thankful to my dear Lord for all He has done for me.

I am first of all finishing Ken’s quilt, and then making several fun quilts that will be simply for my spring exhibit at G Street Fabrics in Rockville, Maryland and then for sale…not necessarily for shows. One book is well along the way and two are outlined and started.  The next thing is to make a bunch of samples for these books.  And I will have to make some new clothes if I actually succeed in my weight loss program, but that will probably be in the second half of the year.

This is a preliminary design of one of my quilts for the exhibit based on the digital flowers in the middle that I have spent several weeks painting in my spare time and finished today.  I plan to have the central section printed on fabric. The borders will have a little more to them.

Sew happy everyone.  May you have a wonderfully blessed and productive 2017.  Celebrate!

A New Birdfeeder

This week I replaced my birdfeeder.  The old one had gotten really beaten up with that huge snow storm and the subsequent wind storms we have had here this year.  It never worked well anyway.  It had mostly plastic and it blew sideways, dumping the birdseed in a windstorm.  It got the seed stuck at the bottom with every rainstorm because the drain holes were ill placed and inadequate, and finally the place the birds stood broke off altogether.  So I replaced it with a nice heavier and sturdier feeder made with brass, stainless steel, and glass (I hope the glass doesn’t break in future storms since we sometimes get a lot of wind here).  It seems really nicely shaped for the birds to use too.

The birds like it.  I put it up a few days ago and already I have had a constant crew of various finches, mourning doves, black birds, cardinals, and the ever plentiful sparrows.  But the real treat was two bird varieties I have never had at my feeder (or seen there at least).

The first day an American gold finch paid a call.  Here is a picture of one from Cornell’s All About Birds site:

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

I’ve seen them fly by occasionally but they never paid a visit when I watched until yesterday.

Today, I had a bird visit that I have never had the pleasure of seeing.  He not only visited, but he stayed long enough for me to get a real good look at him with my binoculars.  This picture is also from Cornell’s All About Birds.

Rose Breasted Grosbeak

Rose Breasted Grosbeak

I walked out onto my back deck today and listened for a few minutes while the birds were singing and chattering, and the air felt wonderful, and went out front where my azalea is blooming its head off, and then I went upstairs into my delightful studio and worked on a quilt while I thought about my great family and how I have had many wonderful opportunities and experiences, and I came back down to my kitchen and used my floor scrubber to clean the kitchen floor without having to get down on my aging knees with a scrub brush like my grandmother did, and then I made myself a wonderful low-carb chicken dinner and watched The Martian and it made me think about all the good ways I have been taught to take one problem in life at a time and figure out how to solve it.  Yes!! That WAS a very long run on sentence.  😀   😀  😀

I am very blessed.

Sew happy everyone.  May you all be so blessed and may birds and flowers bling up your space in this world.

 

A Watch Project and MAQF

The cheap white plastic watch ready to ink.

The cheap white plastic watch ready to ink.

I leave tomorrow for the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Festival in Hampton, VA and a visit with my family members there.  I’m very excited.  It looks like the weather is going to cooperate and the trip is all happily arranged.  So in the way of things, the battery died in my beautiful Bolova watch and I really didn’t have time to take it to a jewelry and get it changed (I can’t do that one myself) before I went.  So I ordered this cheap white plastic watch with one-day delivery for about the same a battery would cost.  And yes, I will still get the Bolova fixed, but I also wanted a watch to wear when I am working with paints and dyes, etc.

When it came, and I put it on, it seemed to scream…cheap white plastic watch here!  So my son David suggested I paint it if I could.  What a great idea.  I tried out several markers on the back of the strap and found only one will stay without wiping off..Sharpies.  I have a nice collection of sharpies, and so I turned it into this:

After...It was hard to keep any kind of straightness, so I ended up doing wandering colors.

After…It was hard to keep any kind of straightness, so I ended up doing wandering colors.

It is seemingly dry now.  I’m going to let it continue to dry for another hour or so before putting it on.  It may wear off as I wear it, but just passing a cloth over it, there is no change of color or stain on the cloth.  After that dried I painted over it with clear finger nail polish.  We’ll see how this wears.  The fun thing is the numbers on the watch face are all different colors kind of like a color wheel, so it fits the project.

Sew I’m off to my neice’s first thing in the morning, and on to MAQF on Friday and Saturday, home Sunday.  How fun is that?!

Sew happy everyone!

I Am a Magpie

This nice drawing is from Dover's Chinese Designs.  Whatever would I do without Dover!

This nice drawing is from Dover’s Chinese Designs. I THINK this MAY be a magpie, but it’s pretty even if it isn’t.  Whatever would I do without Dover!

I have concluded after several years of art quilting that am “a magpie”.  I love light and how it plays across crystals, water, shiny paints, Angelina Fibers, and Metallic Threads.  It seems magical to me.

This week my oldest talented son Ken, who doesn’t share my love of such things, nevertheless rephotographed “Sky Horse”, because even though it has been out in the shows for a little over a year now, I want to show it a bit more and I didn’t think the photos I had of it were adequate.  This is a very difficult quilt to photograph just because of the way the light bounces all around.  I thought he did a really wonderful job, so I thought I’d share it with you.

Sky Horse photographed by Ken Tatum

Sky Horse photographed by Ken Tatum November 2015

I don’t have sparkles or gold or some such on all my quilts, but I do on a lot of them.  I am planning a new deep space quilt for one of my 2016 show quilts.  I am basing this one on M51

One of the many NASA photos of the Whirlpool Galaxy.

One of the many NASA photos of  M51.

One of the things that inspired me to use a spiral galaxy for my next deep space quilt are these two  photos featured by NASA on their pictures of the day.

This image shows the galaxy Messier 94, which lies in the small northern constellation of the Hunting Dogs, about 16 million light-years away. Within the bright ring around Messier 94 new stars are forming at a high rate and many young, bright stars are present within it – thanks to this, this feature is called a starburst ring. The cause of this peculiarly shaped star-forming region is likely a pressure wave going outwards from the galactic centre, compressing the gas and dust in the outer region. The compression of material means the gas starts to collapse into denser clouds. Inside these dense clouds, gravity pulls the gas and dust together until temperature and pressure are high enough for stars to be born.

This image shows the galaxy Messier 94, which lies in the small northern constellation of the Hunting Dogs, about 16 million light-years away. Within the bright ring around Messier 94 new stars are forming at a high rate and many young, bright stars are present within it – thanks to this, this feature is called a starburst ring. The cause of this peculiarly shaped star-forming region is likely a pressure wave going outwards from the galactic centre, compressing the gas and dust in the outer region. The compression of material means the gas starts to collapse into denser clouds. Inside these dense clouds, gravity pulls the gas and dust together until temperature and pressure are high enough for stars to be born.

And

ngc3521_hstGendler_960

Ken and his wife Beth are into astronomy.  They own a telescope and are part of a star gazing group.  So I have some interest and guidance from them in my deep space quilts even though neither of them particularly like the way I approach them with sparkly Angelina Fibers and crystals.  But we will see what they think of my spiral galaxy quilt when I get it finished.  Sky Horse is not as close to the look of the Horsehead Nebula as I had hoped to achieve, but I think maybe I can get closer to the look of a spiral galaxy.  We’ll see.

I am fairly backed up in my quilt making with some deadlines, so I probably won’t get to this one until sometime in January or February.  Once I improve my technique significantly and feel I can really explain it well, I have plans for sharing how to make one yourself, but not just yet.

Sew happy everyone.  Are you a magpie too?

 

Creativity in the Face of Dark Times

Recent news is the kind  that makes you hug your loved ones a little tighter, think a little bit about the future, and thank God for your blessings and that you are safe today.  Gilbert Muniz, one of my extremely creative friends, had this to say on Facebook last Friday:

Going offline for at least today. I’m unable to process all the news coming in from Paris right now. I can’t process how sick and depressed this information makes me.
Paris is a living, thriving testament to how much beauty and creativity can exist in the world. I was honored to be able to visit Paris for a design competition in 1999. I met a collective of artists that both admired and respected the city’s ability to both recruit and nurture art, and that is the memory I’m holding on to right now.
No one should have to endure what befell last night. We as Americans are forced to recall memories of September 11th and the sorrow we all felt from that day. For what we have all gone through, today, we are all Parisian.
I encourage everyone to be creative today, if only for a day. Bring some beauty into the world with your art. I personally have to stay busy or the thoughts of this tragedy will drive me insane, and we all know that’s already a short trip. 😉
I’m working with my new indigo vat all day today. I know it’s a small gesture to fill the world with something creative, and I know it won’t fix the issues we face today, but maybe, just maybe, someone will smile because of what I’ve made, and frankly, that might just be enough right now.
Be safe, everyone.
  

I particularly liked his point about making someone smile because of something he made.  I think about my youngest son, David, who writes fantasy/sci-fi novels that are absorbing and fun and he is close to releasing a new novel.  I think about my oldest son, his wife and son.  All of them make me smile with happiness, do what they can to help me in my life, as I do what I can to help them. Our family works well and it is a wonderful thing.

Sew I am working on my new storm-at-sea quilt that is the second in my “Waiting…” series today.  I have been a little off my game physically lately, but am getting much better.  During this time I have come up several quilts I really want to make (see this blogpost), and now I am beginning to feel like working on them again.

Sew in this time of bad news, make things that make people smile, feel inspired, or just takes their mind off of their fears and troubles for a while, or teach someone to do these things.  Keep on marching forward and being creative, lighting up the space near us with beauty and fun despite the dark times.

Sew happy everyone!  God’s blessings be upon you and stay safe.

A Journey to Art Quilts…One Problem Set at a Time

I am not yet seventy and have been sewing for over 60 years, having begun when I was 4 or 5.  It may seem odd, but I clearly remember sewing as a small child on my small Singer, set up next to my Mom while she sewed on her “big machine”. I made Barbie doll clothes (the only real good use for a Barbie, as far as I was concerned), pot holders, and the skirt for a dressing table at first. When I was about  eight I made my first complete dress.  It was quilting fabric, I believe, with maps and sailing ships and so forth on a blue background.  It had box pleats for the skirt and a simple top with, yes, set in sleeves.  I remember wearing it to school with great happiness and not a little pride.  From that time until the present, I made many things… bags, hats, dresses, wedding dresses, tailored suits–even men’s tuxedos–men’s ties, scarves, overcoats, fur coats, and just about anything for the home, but I did not quilt.

On October 1 of 2003, the love of my life passed away and I subsequently moved to be near my oldest son and his wife who were expecting my grandson.  Shortly after I moved, my daughter-in-law, who had taken up quilting and enjoyed it so much that she bought a longarm for her own use, suggested that I might enjoy quilting.  And so it began…

Now I had done just a few wall hangings and fabric as art before this time, making my church’s banners, and a few other wall hangings, but they were not quilts, and they were a long long ways in quality from where I am now as to what I can make for a show quilt.

Sew I set about to learn to quilt about a year after his passing.  It was a great solace to my sore heart following the death of Marvin.  I had something new and grand to learn, because I found that even though I could make almost anything else using fabric and thread, I could not make a very good quilt.  Surprise! It took me several years because I was working, hard, for the government at the time.

The quilts I made at first had really bad bindings, the designs were mediocre, and the quilting wasn’t very good.  They weren’t terrible, because I was, after all, a professional quality sewist.  But I was not a quilter, and I wanted to compete.  Using someone else’s patterns never really occurred to me.  I really don’t know why.

The best thing that happened in this journey was that Alex Anderson and Ricky Tims decided to pull together The Quilt Show on the Internet in 2007.  They brought in the great quilters who demonstrated how to do things…and one by one I picked up a new skill or tool and ran with it.  Given my long solid background of sewing and art, I could pick up the techniques with just one show, which I was able to watch over and over.  Sometimes, I bought a book that was mentioned and then I started taking classes with these great quilters themselves whenever I could get to a quilt show.  More recently, I have found online classes that are available and I can take them right here at my own studio, and yes, I still take classes.  What a great thing!

When I first became aware of the use of paint on quilts as an art form I was opposed to its use, thinking it wasn’t, somehow, right.  How silly of me.  The first time I realized I was wrong was when I saw Hollis Chatelain’s Precious Water, which took Best of Show in Houston in 2004.  If you look at her work, you will realize it is beyond question fine art that is not only beautifully painted, but a well crafted quilt in fabric and thread, and truly worthy of the prize. The competitive traditional quilting world was really shaken over this, I think.  Many felt that quilts are supposed to be for the bed, to cuddle with, to love, to wrap your baby with, and were not meant to ever be art for your wall.  Or if you did use it as art for your wall, it should be to show the great beauty of this historic traditional craft and only traditional.  I am sure that many still feel that way today, however…

…quilters are a loving and inclusive group as a whole, and not very many of them are what one might endearingly refer to as “old biddies” or “quilt police”.   This past several years I have witnessed art quilts move from shocking other quilters to a position of their own in the show quilting world.  These quilts take all kinds of forms…now you can make a traditional quilt as art just to show on the wall, and that is grand, but you can also use the quilt as your medium to produce art of many styles and be respected for it.  Exquisite, interesting, modern, and often full of emotional pull  art designs can now be realized in fabric, thread, paint, beads, and other embellishments, and be treated with the same respect as the exquisite traditional quilts and contemporary quilts have always been in the show world.  And the wonderful thing is that this in no way has diminished the great appreciation of the traditional beauties also shown.  It is hard now to predict whether a traditional quilt. a contemporary quilt,  or an art quilt will take Best of Show just from the category alone.  They have become side by side equals.  I hope you feel that is a grand thing.

I see little glimmers here and there that the traditional art world may even be beginning to warm to such show quilts as “real”art.  I suspect, however, that this one will take even longer to be seen by the traditional art world as side by side equals to the more traditional forms of art of painting and sculpture.

So what is required of me, as a now professional art quilter, to continuously reach higher as both an artist and a quilter? I believe it is imperative in keeping the creativity alive to constantly reach beyond one’s abilities to pull meaningful art out and share it with people.  It is just plain fun too.

How is this done?

I just came home from watching the movie made from the fabulous book by Andy Weir “The Martian”.  I found it inspiring.  It is largely the story of how the people involved, and in particular the protagonist who was the guy left on Mars in the mistaken belief he was dead, solved the enormous problem they were faced with on how to keep him alive until rescue could come, and how to rescue him.  Each vastly overwhelming problem was approached by solving a smaller set of problems and each of those sets by solving each part of that problem one step at a time, and readjusting as new problems arise.  Never giving up was the key.

This is the same approach I try to take on a much lesser scale to creating my art in the form of quilts.  I see so many things in the world surrounding me that inspire visions of quilts within my mind.  I must have a hundred quilt ideas tucked away in the recesses of my mind by now and new ones come nearly every day.  So I must first solve which quilts I will actually make, and draw out the design.  I ignore whether or not I think I can do this design or not until I actually start making it…breaking it down into individual problem sets and breaking those down into individual steps.  Sometimes along the way, I change the design because the original concept did not work.  So now it becomes something doable.  My mother used to constantly say “inch by inch it’s a cinch”.  She was right.

Of course, this approach came from my mother and father.  It carried me through my life as a wife and mother and my years of work for the Federal government where I did work I can not tell you about, but the approach was often the same to accomplishing anything difficult…break it down into workable components and do that.  It’s the same approach as it takes to make a man’s tailored suit…accomplishing each section one by one and finally putting it all together and then adding the final touches.  It is the same approach one must use to make a fabulous traditional quilt…one section at a time…one small component at a time…just don’t give up and fix the mistakes along the way.

Just a few weeks ago, one of my more unusual and difficult to make quilts won a ribbon for “Best Use of Color” in its category.  It was “Sky Horse”, which had also been shown at last year’s Houston show.  I hope to make more deep space quilts based on NASA’s great photos they have that are (mostly) copyright free.  I am taking an online class right now on painting nebula using Corel Painter 16, and have found it giving me many ideas on how I can improve future nebula quilts.  And in some ways as meaningful as a ribbon, one of my smaller quilts was just appraised in replacement value alone (does not include the design work) for over five thousand dollars by an AQS certified appraiser.  I have a friend who just sold one of her smaller art quilts about the same size (that also just won a Best of Show) for ten thousand dollars to an art collector.  This, my dear friends, seems to be progress to me for us art quilters.  May it continue, and wish me well as I try to make however many of the quilts buzzing around in my mind I can before I either get too old or join Marvin in heaven (whichever happens first).

Sew happy everyone!  Make that master quilt or piece of furniture or tailored suit or amazing decorated cake you have always thought you couldn’t do…solving one problem set at a time.  Oh, rest assured that I still love the traditional quilts made to cuddle and made for the bed, the lap, the baby, and the dog…well worth the making and a treasure to love.

Lessons Learned About Quilt Entries and Photographs

Last night my oldest son Ken and his wife Beth invited me over to assist me in getting better photos of Canterbury Silk. Canterbury Silk received a very nice ribbon at MQX Midwest last year…Best Surface Design. It was shown at Mid Atlantic Quilt Festival. But it was rejected by AQS Paducah, AQS Syracuse, and AQS Grand Rapids. I think it may have been because of the not very good photograph I had sent in with those entries. I had used the same photo, and I didn’t realize how poor it was until a friend of mine on Facebook told me privately that the quilt was out of square and had some waves down the side. I still have it entered into AQS Chattanooga, and asked if I could replace the photo for that consideration. Fortunately, I slipped under the wire of being able to do that if I could get the photo there by this morning.

I spent several days trying to get the photo right. It was a lot better, but it still did not show the quilt as well as it should. It looked square, but if I got it so you could see the quilting, the colors seemed off elsewhere and the white bird washed out. So Ken, who has a really fine camera and a really keen eye, photographed it last night until he got a very good photo. He also did Canterbury Knight for me. So here is the result. I thought you might like to see the difference in the photo I submitted at first and the updated photo Ken took last night. Here is the original photo:

Canterbury Silk

Canterbury Silk

And here is the new photo (it actually is even  better than this, because I had to reduce the size for the blog): Canterbury Silk - retake I hope this makes enough difference for AQS to jury it into AQS Chattanooga. I love Chattanooga. I went to junior high and most of my high school there so many years ago. It would be a real honor for me to have my quilt there. Whether it does or not, it is clearly a better picture and should assist in other show entries. This is still a relatively new quilt and I plan on showing it and its brother quilt “Canterbury Knight” for several years. That is, if the shows will let them in.

Sew happy everyone. And get those pictures right before you submit them for a contest…ask your friends to tell you about the pictures. You may be surprised, because you are so close to working with your quilts sometimes you don’t even see the flaws on the picture.

Postscript: Several people have asked me about his camera setup. He had two diffused light sources designed for photography, his camera was further away than I could get mine, he used a remote to shoot with so he didn’t shake the tripod, and the quilt is pinned to Beth’s design wall rather than hanging, like I had it. Here are the settings from the image file:
camera data